Latest News

Out-Of-Hours GP Services Are Changing

 

 

We want to provide the right services at a time which is convenient for you. We’ve listened to feedback from people in our local area, and we are making changes to our out-of-hours appointments to deliver better services for you.

The new way of delivering out-of-hours appointments will give you:

 

  • Access to more healthcare professionals. This new service will be delivered by professionals including GPs, Advanced Nurse Practitioners, Practice Nurses and Healthcare Assistants.
  • More choice about the type of appointment you want. These include a mixture of in-person face-to-face appointments, and remote appointments like telephone, video, or online appointments.
  • Make it more convenient for you to travel to out-of-hours appointments. These appointments are being planned and delivered locally, so it is likely they will available closer to your home.

 

From Saturday 1 October 2022, out-of-hours appointments will be available from 6.30pm to 8pm on weekdays, and from 9am to 5pm on Saturdays. In Thurrock, appointments will continue to also be available on Sundays from 12pm to 3pm until Sunday 12 February 2023.

Out-of-hours appointments were previously planned by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) on behalf of many GP practices in a bigger area. From Saturday 1 October 2022, this is now being planned and delivered locally by Primary Care Networks (PCNs) (apart from the additional Sunday appointments available until Sunday 12 February 2023).

We are working together with other GP practices in our local area as part of the Grays Primary Care Network. You can find out more about the Grays Primary Care Network on our PCN website at https://www.grayspcn.nhs.uk/.

An out-of-hours appointment might not be at your regular GP surgery. When you book an appointment, you will be told where the appointment will be.

These appointments will not be available as walk-in appointments. You will need to book them in advance.

To book an out-of-hours appointment, you should contact your regular GP practice in the usual way. They will advise you on the appointments which are available, and which healthcare professional is the right person to help you.

If you need medical help now but it's not an emergency, you can also go to 111 online or call 111.

 

Red Extreme Heat Warning Issued By The Met Office

For the first time temperatures of 40°C have been forecast in the UK and the Met Office has issued the first ever Red warning for exceptional heat.

Exceptional heat is expected to affect a large part of England from Sunday 17 July to Tuesday 19 July, with temperatures likely in the high 30s C in some places and perhaps even reaching 40°C.

The heat health alert for Essex has been ramped up, leading to advice for vulnerable residents such as the elderly, the very young, and people with chronic or severe illness who could be at extra risk.

Health experts are appealing to people to check on friends, relatives and neighbours who may be less able to look after themselves. Advice includes keeping cool, staying hydrated and being prepared – for example, staying out of the sun during the hottest part of the day, drinking cold drinks regularly, such as water and avoiding tea, coffee and alcohol.

People are also urged to make plans for important supplies, such as medicines, to minimise the need to travel during the heat of the day.

 

"In extreme heat, it is vital that people think carefully about what they need to do to protect themselves, their family and particularly vulnerable people"
Dr Pro Mallik

 

“For some, such as older people, those with underlying health conditions and those with young children, the summer heat can bring real health risks. So, if you can, take the opportunity to check in on those family members, friends and neighbours who might need extra assistance.”
Dr Chris Olukanni

 


Advice for what to do during spells of hot weather includes:

  • look out for others, especially older people, young children and babies and those with underlying health conditions
  • drink plenty of fluids and avoid excess alcohol
  • never leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle, especially infants, young children or animals
  • try to keep out of the sun between 11am to 3pm. Walk in the shade, apply sunscreen and wear a hat if you have to go out in the heat. Avoid physical exertion in the hottest parts of the day
  • close curtains on rooms that face the sun to keep indoor spaces cooler and remember it may be cooler outdoors than indoors
  • take care and follow local safety advice if you are going into the water to cool down
  • wear light, loose fitting cotton clothes
  • if you are travelling, make sure you take water with you, check weather forecasts and traffic news
  • plan ahead to make sure you have enough supplies, such as water, food and any medications you need
  • people are urged not to go to A&E or call 999 unless it’s an emergency. If you are in any doubt, NHS111 can help you get the right treatment.

 

Please click on the link below for additional information on how to cope in hot weather –

Heatwave: How To Cope In Hot Weather

 

Support For Patients With Diabetes And Learning Disabilities

Improving Diabetes Care In The Community

The Mid and South Essex Health and Care Partnership are hosting monthly coffee mornings online to promote and help improve diabetes care in the community for people with Learning Disabilities.

The coffee mornings will be hosted from 11:00 – 12:00 on the dates below –

 

  • Wednesday 20 July 2022
  • Wednesday 17 August 2022

 

For more details contact: cprccg.diabetesLDnetwork@nhs.net

 

Support and Learning Day for people with Learning Disabilities and Diabetes

The Mid and South Essex Health and Care Partnership will be hosting a Support and Learning Day for people with Learning Disabilities and Diabetes. This event is for both patients and their support workers or carers.

The details for this event are below –

 

Date: Wednesday 20 July 2022
Time: 09:30 to 16:30
Location: Main Hall, Bishops Hill Adult Community Collage, Rayleigh Road, Hutton, Brentwood CM13 1BD

 

Places are limited. For More information and to book please email jenny.peckham@essex.gov.uk

 

Detection Of Vaccine Derived Polio Virus In London Sewage Samples

With the recent detection of the Vaccine Derived Polio Virus in the London sewage system, Public Health England are working to ensure that the public are kept safe and that any risk to the public is contained.

As a part of the response, your GP surgery has been asked to opportunistically check that patients are up to date with their polio-containing vaccines and to catch-up anyone who is un/under vaccinated.

As such, we at Milton Road Surgery may be contacting our registered patients to get booked in for any missing vaccinations and we encourage you to take up the offer. In addition, we encourage parents to check their child’s Red Book and contact us if there are any vaccinations missing.

 

Learning Disability Week and Cervical Screening Awareness Week

To celebrate Learning Disability Week and Cervical Screening Awareness Week, NHS England and Improvement launched a new video (below) to encourage more people with a learning disability to go for their cervical smear test, and know what kind of support can be asked for.

It is important to involve people with a learning disability in work to reduce health inequalities. The video was designed and written by our NHSE/I colleague Jodie Williams, who stars in the video.

 

 

For other news and resources from learning disability week, and further information about cervical screening, follow @NHSAbility

 

Diabetes Week (13-19th June)

For Diabetes Week, we’re helping promote two digital structured education programmes that are available now across the whole of England:

 

Adults With Type 1 Diabetes


My Type 1 Diabetes is a free digital resource that offers tailored advice and information created by NHS experts and people living with type 1 diabetes. Adults with type 1 diabetes, their families and carers, and healthcare professionals can use this platform to access information about type 1 diabetes through videos, articles, and accredited online education courses.


How to join

The programme is available now via self-referral. Start using the programme today by visiting: https://www.mytype1diabetes.nhs.uk/

My Type 1 Diabetes can:

  • Help participants understand more about type 1 diabetes and increase confidence to manage it.
  • Signpost to content created by other expert organisations.
  • Offer resources in up to 10 other languages including Polish, Spanish and Urdu.
  • Support participants to set achievable goals for diabetes self-care.

 


Adults With Type 2 Diabetes


Healthy Living for people with type 2 diabetes is a free online structured education programme designed to help users learn more about type 2 diabetes. Healthy Living has been clinically proven and can help participants live well with type 2 diabetes.

The programme is available to anyone over the age of 18, living in England with type 2 diabetes. Carers of those living with type 2 diabetes can sign up too.


How to join


The programme is available now via self-referral. Start using the programme today by visiting: https://www.healthyliving.nhs.uk/


Healthy Living provides knowledge and information so users can:

  • Feel confident in managing type 2 diabetes.
  • Reduce diabetes-related distress.
  • Improve health and wellbeing.
  • Achieve and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Feel motivated to continue making healthy lifestyle choices.

 


Thurrock Healthy Lifestyle Service

Have you been thinking about making a few changes to your lifestyle so you can improve your health and quality of life?

Whatever the reason may be, many of us want to cut down on those unhealthy habits. Whether it’s eating less, drinking less alcohol or quitting smoking for good, your local health service is here to help.

Thurrock Healthy Lifestyle Service is a integrated service that aims to provide a single point for residents to access the following services:


Call the service today and one of their specialist advisors will discuss your current lifestyle. From a few simple questions, they will be able to assess which service would be helpful to give you support to make your life healthier and longer.


Contact details

To find out more about the service contact them using the contact information below:

Phone: 0800 292 2299
Email: THLS@thurrock.gov.uk

You can self-refer to the service using the below referral form. Just follow the instructions in the document and return the form to the service.

Thurrock Healthy Lifestyle Referral form (52 KB)

You can find out more about the service by downloading the below service leaflet. Please feel free to share:

Thurrock Healthy Lifestyle Service leaflet (6.47 MB)

 

This Is Diabetes - Diabetes UK

 

Diabetes is a hidden condition. Millions of us live with it, but millions more misunderstand it. And we want to change that. Our newest campaign is all about showing what diabetes is really like, through the stories of the people who live with it day in, day out.   You’ll meet Liz, Jon, Kaajal, Gina, Libby and her parents, as they talk about what life with diabetes is like for them. We know it's different for everyone, but we hope you’ll see some of your own experiences in theirs and know you’re not going through it alone. And we hope it also helps you show others how it feels. Learning to listen to your body and dealing with other people’s opinions. Constantly managing numbers and planning ahead. Being the most organised person you know. We’re here for you. For advice, support and community come to https://www.diabetes.org.uk or call our helpline on 0345 123 2399.

 

Know Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

For non-diabetics, the NDPP (NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme) has a useful tool on their website that measures a person's risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes. Please click on the link below to visit the website and use the tool -

 

Know your risk of Type 2 diabetes

 

Support For Carers - Young Carers

A young carer is someone 18 years-old or younger, who looks after a relative who has:

  • a disability
  • an illness
  • a mental health condition
  • an alcohol problem
  • a drug problem

Young carers often take on an adult’s role by giving practical and emotional support to the people they care for.

 

Young carers aged 8 to 18

If you are a Thurrock young carer aged between 8 and 18 years-old, you can get support from Thurrock Young Carers.

The service is run by Barking and Dagenham Carers, together with Thurrock Council.

You can make a referral to Thurrock Young Carers by completing the Thurrock form at Barking and Dagenham Carers: make a referral.

 

Young carers aged 4 to 8

Young carers aged 4 to 8 years-old can get support from the Sunshine Centre, Tilbury.

 

More information

You can also get information and support from:

 

Learning Disability Awareness Week “Fun for Health” Event

We will be holding a Fun For Health event at Bennett Lodge Care Home (Bennett Lodge Care Home, Chadwell St Mary, RM16 4LD) on Tuesday 14th June from 13:30 to 15:30.

There will be -

  • Cakes and Refreshments
  • Strollecise
  • Dancing
  • Giant Bubbles
  • Smoothie Bike
  • Games & prizes
  • Football Shoot Out
  • Face Painting
  • Carers Goody Bags
  • Mini Health Checks for Carers

There will also be information available on Clubs & Support in the Thurrock area.

Come and join the fun.

 

Click on the picture below for out event poster -

LD Poster

 

Community COVID Vaccination Pop Ups

Please find below the details of three Pop Up COVID Vaccination clinics in Grays and Tilbury until 25 June 2022 -

ASDA Tilbury,Thurrock Park Way, Tilbury RM18 7HJ

Every Thursday from 1000 - 1500 (until 23/06/2022)

 

IKEA Lakeside, Lakeside Retail Park, Heron Way, Grays RM20 3WJ

Every Friday from 1000 - 1500 (until 24/06/2022)

 

South Essex College Grays, High Street Grays Essex RM17 6TF

Every Saturday from 1000 - 1500 (until 25/06/2022)

 

Clinics are open for -

  • Adults, 16 yrs and above for 1st and 2nd doses and Boosters (if 90 days since 2nd Dose).
  • 12-15 year olds for 1st and 2nd vaccinations.
  • Spring Boosters for those who are eligible.

 

No appointment needed.

Further information regarding Walk-In COVID Vaccination Clinics in Thurrock can be found by visiting the link below -

https://www.essexcovidvaccine.nhs.uk/thurrock-walk-in-clinics/

 

Monkeypox 

Monkeypox is a rare infection that's mainly spread by wild animals in parts of west or central Africa. The risk of catching it in the UK is low. 

You can catch monkeypox from an infected animal if you're bitten or you touch its blood, body fluids, spots, blisters or scabs. 

It may also be possible to catch monkeypox by eating meat from an infected animal that has not been cooked thoroughly, 

Monkeypox in the UK 

Only a small number of people have been diagnosed with monkeypox in the UK. 

You're extremely unlikely to have monkeypox if: 

  • you have not recently travelled to west or central Africa 
  • you have not been in close contact with someone who has monkeypox (such as touching their skin or sharing bedding) 

Things you can do to avoid getting monkeypox 

Although monkeypox is rare, there are things you can do to reduce your risk of getting it. 

Do 

  • wash your hands with soap and water regularly or use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser 
  • only eat meat that has been cooked thoroughly 

Don’t 

  • do not go near wild or stray animals, including dead animals 
  • do not go near any animals that appear unwell 
  • do not eat or touch meat from wild animals (bush meat) 
  • do not share bedding or towels with people who are unwell and may have monkeypox 
  • do not have close contact with people who are unwell and may have monkeypox 

 

Symptoms of monkeypox 

If you get infected with monkeypox, it usually takes between 5 and 21 days for the first symptoms to appear. 

The first symptoms of monkeypox include: 

  • a high temperature 
  • a headache 
  • muscle aches 
  • backache 
  • swollen glands 
  • shivering (chills) 
  • exhaustion 

A rash usually appears 1 to 5 days after the first symptoms. The rash often begins on the face, then spreads to other parts of the body. 

The rash is sometimes confused with chickenpox. It starts as raised spots, which turn into small blisters filled with fluid. These blisters eventually form scabs which later fall off. 

The symptoms usually clear up in 2 to 4 weeks. 

Contact your GP or call 111 if: 

You have a rash with blisters and either: 

  • you've returned from west or central Africa in the last 3 weeks 
  • you've been in close contact with someone who has monkeypox in the last 3 weeks 

Make sure you tell the person you speak to if you've recently travelled to central or west Africa, or have had close contact with someone who has monkeypox. 

Stay at home and avoid close contact with other people until you've been told what to do. 

If you're still abroad, try to get medical help where you are as soon as possible. 

Find more information on monkeypox on GOV.UK 


Prostate-Image

Prostate Cancer - Check your risk

Dr Mallik says "Let's talk prostate. There isn't a national screening programme for men, like there is for women with breast cancer. However, being aware of the symptoms and picking up prostate cancer early has a 10 year survival rate of almost 98%. What are you waiting for? Tell your loved ones to do the checker".

Follow this link and answer three quick questions to check your risk.



Do we make ourselves clear?

Do you have a disability, impairment or sensory loss and need to receive information in a way you can easily understand?

If YES, please inform us at reception so we can make sure you have access to information you understand.

sensory-accessible

Accessible Information Standard Video: 


Patient Alert - Asthma and Lung UK warning as pollen levels rise

 

 

Pollen levels are known to be rising and as such the Practice is keen to ensure our patients who suffer with hay fever and/or asthma are aware of peak pollen times and the importance of carrying their inhaler.

While some hay fever meds are in short supply, there are concerns that the upcoming dry warm weather could prove problematic.

With rising grass pollen levels - the most common hay fever trigger - on the increase between May and July and the forecast for the next few days warming we are raising the profile of advice from Asthma and Lung UK to take extra care.

Streaming, itchy eyes, sneezing, tiredness, a blocked nose and sometimes wheezing or breathing difficulties can all be symptoms of an allergic reaction to pollen as the body mounts a reaction to the foreign invader and releases a chemical called histamine.
Dr Chris Olukanni, GP Partner encourages patients with asthma to be actively aware and says: "When pollen levels are at their highest, those people with lung conditions like asthma can suffer serious symptoms and there is increased risk of a life-threatening attack which can leave people fighting for breath. This can be terrifying, but there are key things all those who suffer can do to look after themselves."

Using preventer inhalers as prescribed will help prevent symptoms such as wheezing and coughing before they start and we also advise people to carry their reliever inhalers every day, especially when they are out and about enjoying the sunshine in case pollen does cause a flare-up of symptoms. Reliever inhalers quickly relax the muscles in the airways and ease symptoms immediately.

Other helpful recommendations from Asthma and Lung UK, includes a suggestion to use a steroid nasal spray every day, together with non-drowsy antihistamine tablets to stop the allergic reaction.

Many sufferers claim rubbing Vaseline around your nostrils or across your cheek bones is the ultimate hack for hay fever. Designed to be the ultimate pollen catcher, dabbing it on your face can help create a balm barrier which traps the pollen before it's able to enter your system through the eyes or nose.

The method is also a popular one with parents trying to treat pollen allergies in children too young to take many medicines.

 

Reduce the risk of hay fever triggering an asthma attack

  • Carry your reliever inhaler (usually blue) every day. You might also refer to this as your rescue inhaler. These quickly relax the muscles in your airways and ease your asthma or COPD symptoms on the spot, so it’s important to carry your reliever inhaler with you.
  • Take any preventer or maintenance treatments every day, as prescribed. This will help prevent your lungs from reacting to pollen. In asthma, this is even more crucial, as asthma preventer inhalers contain a low dose of steroid, which dampens down the inflammation that can be set off by pollen and other triggers.
  • Treat hay fever symptoms with antihistamine pills and sprays or a steroid nasal spray. There are lots of different medicine options for hay fever. Your pharmacist can help you decide what to try.

 


When to see your GP

If you have hay fever, it’s likely that it’s triggering your asthma or lung condition symptoms if you:

  • feel wheezy
  • feel breathless
  • have a tight feeling in your chest
  • are coughing more than usual
  • have asthma and are needing to use your reliever inhaler (usually blue) three times a week or more

 

The Partners and Practice team urge you to make contact if symptoms worsen or where breathing is affected seek urgent medical assistance.

 

Mental Health  Awareness Week

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week and we have been actively working to raise awareness of services that patients can access directly.This year’s theme is loneliness, so we have been encouraging people to ‘lift someone out of loneliness’ as part of the Better Health - Every Mind Matters campaign with more NHS advice available here.


Kooth Service for Children and Young People - Free, safe and anonymous online counselling and support for young people.

Kooth is an online counselling and emotional wellbeing support service providing young people aged 11-26 years in Thurrock with a free, safe and secure means of accessing support from a professional team of qualified counsellors.

 

 

Kooth.com is a well-established, award winning online counselling agency and is accredited by The British Association of Psychotherapy and Counselling (BACP). Founded in 2001, they are leading pioneers of online counselling in the UK, having won a number of prestigious awards. It is a transformational lifeline that has successfully helped and continues to reach the very vulnerable, many of whom would never have access to face-to-face counselling.

 

Young people can access this service anonymously by signing onto the Kooth website. The Kooth service includes:

 

  • Drop in chats with counsellors
  • Booked 1:1 chats with a counsellor
  • Themed message forums
  • Secure web-based email
  • Articles regarding mental health

 

Please visit www.xenzone.com/kooth for information about Kooth.

 


Need support for your Smear Test?

If you have experienced trauma or mental illness and find cervical screening (smear tests) difficult, Jo's Cervical Cancer trust has some great information, including this video on support you can get before and after your smear test.

 



The Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust free booklet may also help. It has been created with mental health service users and healthcare professionals to offer some extra support with the test, including tips for during the appointment and a checklist of things that may make the test hard for you to share with your nurse.
This booklet was developed by researchers at the University of West London and Surrey University, with support from Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust.

Please click on the link below to download and view the booklet.

Support available for your cervical screening (smear test)

 

For more information, please visit the Jo's Trust Website by clicking the picture below -

 


Looking After Someone - Information And Support For Carers

Looking after Someone is a helpful guide for anyone caring for family or friends. The guide outlines your rights as a carer and gives an overview of the practical and financial support available.

The Carers UK Looking After Someone guide is divided into the following sections:

 

  • Getting Help and Support
  • Your Finances
  • Your Work.

 

The guide includes:

 

  • 'A Carer’s Guide': an illustrated introduction to the challenges of caring, from making difficult decisions to looking after your health and wellbeing.
  • Benefits: an overview of which benefits you or the person you care for may be entitled to and information about how to get a benefits check.
    Other financial help: including help with council tax, fuel costs, pensions and health costs.
  • Practical help: including community care assessment, carer's assessment and direct payments.
  • Technology: information about health and care technology that could make life easier for you and the person you care for.
  • Your workplace: your rights at work, from flexible working and parental leave to protection from discrimination.
  • Other help: how to find other help nationally and in your local community.

 

To download a copy of the guide please click on the picture below -

 


Healthy Heart Month - Supporting People with Learning Disabilities

Your College Health Practice team recognises that people with learning disabilities are more likely to be overweight (obese) than people in the general population.

Women with learning disabilities are even more likely to be obese. People who are obese are at much greater risk of health problems such as heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes and mobility difficulties.

The two main ways to reduce weight are diet and exercise. For most people, bringing their weight down to healthy levels involves both exercising more and eating healthier amounts of healthier foods as well as avoiding fattening foods and sugary drinks.

People with learning disabilities are less likely to do regular exercise and eat a balanced diet with enough fruit and vegetables.

Barriers to losing weight for people with learning disabilities

There are lots of reasons why it may be more difficult for people with learning disabilities to lose weight. Some people with learning disabilities don’t do exercise because they don’t know the benefits. It can take more time to cook a healthy meal than to have a ready meal. Lack of time and lack of support staff can make it difficult for people to eat healthy foods and to take exercise.

Some places like the gym and swimming pool can be difficult to get to, expensive, not easy to access and people don’t always feel welcome.

The Annual Health Check

During an Annual Health Check at the Surgery, the Nurse will help provide motivational and practical support and encourage the support worker/carer to help plan and cook more healthy meals and to be more active.

There are lots of easy-read resources on healthy eating and physical activity and a great video link below that follows real life stories of people living with LD who are similarly trying to make changes to lifestyles to help them live with a healthy heart.

 

The video above follows real life stories of people with learning disabilities who are trying to make changes to their lifestyles to help them live with a healthy heart.

 

In support of Healthy Heart Month please encourage the person you support to attend an annual health check. This is a good opportunity to think about weight management.

Let us know if you need any further information or support to book your check today....

 


Smear tests for people with a Learning Disability

Smear tests are happening, and you may get a letter inviting you to come to the Practice. We know you may find smear tests confusing or worrying, but you are not alone if you feel this way. If you want to ask questions about having a smear test, please discuss this with a Nurse at your College Health Surgery or alternatively there is a Free Helpline on 0808 802 8000. Other ways to get help can be found by visiting the Jo's Trust Support Page.

 

What is a smear test?

A smear test is a free health test. It is sometimes called cervical screening.

It makes sure your cervix is healthy.

Your cervix is inside your body at the top of your vagina. You cannot see it.


Video - What happens at a smear test?

 

The video above is about smear tests. It tells you what happens at a smear test and why it is important. Women with a learning disability are in the video and were involved in making it.

 

The video above is  a video from the NHS which shows the experience that Jodie had when having her smear test done.

 

Who has a smear test?

All women between age 25 and 64 are asked if they want to have a smear test and you are invited:

  • every 3 years between age 25 and 49
  • every 5 years between age 50 and 64

Smear tests can help stop you getting cervical cancer. It is your choice whether to have a smear test. Having the right information can help you decide.

Please visit the Jo's Trust Website for more information by clicking the picture below -

 

End The Abuse Of Staff In GP Practices

Please watch this campaign video by the IGPM (Institute of General Practice Management) regarding ending the abuse of staff in GP practices.

 

 

In this video GP receptionists share the abuse they have experienced first hand.
All have been frontline key workers during the pandemic.

With the majority of GP Practice Staff (78%) facing threatening behaviour, racist or sexist abuse from patients, and 83% reporting having called the police for help, the Institute of General Practice Management (IGPM) launches a campaign to end all abuse towards general practice staff.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Information

 

COVID Vaccination

Please click on the image above to view our COVID-19 vaccination information page.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Status For International Travel

When travelling abroad, you may be required to show your COVID-19 Vaccination Status.

Demonstrating your COVID-19 vaccination status allows you to show others that you’ve had a full course of the COVID-19 vaccine when travelling abroad to some countries or territories. A full course is currently 2 doses of any approved vaccine.

COVID-19 vaccination status is available to people who live in England and are registered with a GP, or have an NHS number.

You can get your vaccination status in digital or paper format. Please note that the NHS appointment card from vaccination centres cannot be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.

You can access your COVID-19 vaccination status via the following methods -

 

Through the NHS App

 


You can access your COVID-19 vaccination status through the free NHS App from 17 May. You can access the app through mobile devices such as a smartphone or tablet. Proof of your COVID-19 vaccination status will be shown within the NHS App. We recommend that you register with the app before booking international travel.

By Calling 119

If you do not have access to a smartphone and know that the country you are travelling to requires COVID-19 vaccination status, you can call the NHS helpline on 119 (from 17 May) and ask for a letter to be posted to you. This must be at least 5 working days after you’ve completed your course of the vaccine. We expect the letter to take up to 5 working days to reach you.
The letter will be sent automatically to the address registered with your GP. The 119 call handler you speak to will not be able to see your address to check this with you. If you’ve recently moved house, make sure you’ve given your new address to your GP practice before calling 119.

DO NOT CONTACT YOUR GP SURGERY ABOUT YOUR COVID-19 VACCINATION STATUS. GPS CANNOT PROVIDE LETTERS SHOWING YOUR COVID-19 VACCINATION STATUS.

Please visit GOV.UK - Demonstrating your COVID-19 vaccination status when travelling abroad for more information.

 

Register your New Born Baby And Sign Up To eRedBook

College Health is urging new parents to register newborn babies with a GP as soon as possible, so that they don’t miss out on vital health services.

It’s important that you register your baby as a new family member with your GP to access vital health services such as the GP infant 6-8-week check and the immunisation programme.

The process to register your newborn baby with your GP has been simplified during the COVID-19 Pandemic. You can now register your baby with your GP without registering the Baby's birth with the Registrar. This is usually a formal requirement and a process to be completed by six weeks of age for the baby. This process usually includes issuing a Birth certificate to prove the Birth Registration has been undertaken, normally a requirement to subsequently register your infant with your GP. However, during the Coronavirus pandemic, Birth registrations with the Registrar have been temporarily suspended.

You do not currently need a birth certificate to register your baby with the GP Practice; all you need to do is:

  • Call your GP practice and tell the receptionist that you wish to register your child with the GP, or

  • Contact your practice via online and follow the process.

Any information required to register the baby with your GP will be in your baby’s red book, so have it handy when making the call or online application for details required.

Why not register for a digital eRedbook online for easy access to your baby’s details. Details of the registration page are below.

 

eRedbook – Your Digital Redbook

 

The eRedbook is the UK’s digital personal child health record. The app gives you access to your child’s important health records and helps you track their healthy growth and development.

eRedbook is a parent-held personal child health record, beginning at birth that supports children through the healthy child programme and works to:

 

    • Empower parents to take control of their child's health

    • Enables professionals to interact with parents digitally

    • Supports new ways of working during COVID and beyond.

 

Please follow the link below to find out more and register for the service –

https://www.eredbook.org.uk/

 

Register Your Type 1 Opt-out Preference

The data held in your GP medical records is shared with other healthcare professionals for the purposes of your individual care. It is also shared with other organisations to support health and care planning and research.

If you do not want your personally identifiable patient data to be shared outside of your GP practice for purposes except your own care, you can register an opt-out with your GP practice. This is known as a Type 1 Opt-out.

Follow the link below to download the Type 1 Opt-out Preference Form -

 

Type 1 Opt-out Preference Form

 

You can use this form to:

 

  • Register a Type 1 Opt-out, for yourself or for a dependent (if you are the parent or legal guardian of the patient) (to Opt-out)

  • Withdraw an existing Type 1 Opt-out, for yourself or a dependent (if you are the parent or legal guardian of the patient) if you have changed your preference (Opt-in)

 

This decision will not affect individual care and you can change your choice at any time, using this form. This form, once completed, should be sent to your GP practice by email or post.

 

More information about the National Data Opt-out is here:

https://www.nhs.uk/your-nhs-data-matters/

 

Roadmap Out Of Lockdown for England (Spring 2021)

With lockdown restrictions easing across England and the UK, the Government have published a roadmap out of lockdown for England.

Please watch this video which explains the stages and steps of the roadmap out of lockdown for England.

 

The stages and steps of this roadmap can be viewed in the pictures below. Please click on each picture to view a larger version.

 

Roadmap 1

 

Roadmap 2

 

Social Distancing and Self Isolation Sick Notes

 

Social Distancing: What You Need To Do

To stop the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19), please follow government guidance on social distancing. Information can be found by clicking on the link below -

Staying Alert And Safe Social Distancing

 


Self Isolation Sick Notes

If you have been told to self-isolate because of Coronavirus (COVID-19) and you need a note for your employer, you can now generate your own sick note via the link below -

NHS.uk Self-Isolation And Treating Coronavirus Symptoms

To generate the Isolation note, scroll down the page and click “Get Isolation Note”.

This will take you to the NHS 111 page where patients will be asked to answer a few questions. On completion a reference number will be emailed to the patient which is the sick note.

 

COVID-19 Bereavement Line

St Luke's are currently running a dedicated bereavement line for people that have lost loved ones to COVID-19.

The line is available Monday to Thursday from 1300 – 1630 and the number is below:

0333 400 2358

For more information please click the link below:

St Luke's Hospice Covid Bereavement Support Line

We hope this will help in times of need.

 

Employer Letter Regarding The Issue Of Medical Certificates Related To The COVID-19 Pandemic

Please follow the link below to download a letter for your employer regarding medical certificates for absence from work related to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Employer Letter RE: Medical Certificates

 

Advice For Parents With A Child That Is Sick Or Injured

Please click the link below to view a poster with information for parents on what to do if a child becomes unwell.

COVID-19 Advice For Parents When Child Unwell Or Injured

 

COVID-19 Patient Q&A Document

Please find below a link to a document that answers some of the common questions relating to COVID-19 that have been asked by patients across the College Health Practices.

Patient Q&A Document

 

Rescue Medication (Rescue Pack) Hoax

There has been an unhelpful and misleading message being widely spread on social media advising people with respiratory conditions including asthma and COPD to seek “rescue medication” from their GP.

Please DO NOT ask your GP for ‘rescue medication’ if you don’t usually have standby medication for your respiratory condition. The original post was taken down. It was posted in good faith but is potentially dangerous and is certainly unhelpful.

 

British Lung Foundation’s response

“We’ve been made aware of some posts on social media saying that if you have a lung condition, your GP will issue a rescue pack of steroids and antibiotics.

If you're normally advised to have a rescue pack available to treat your lung condition then it's a good idea to check you have one. This is recommended for some with COPD to be used as part of a personalised plan. For people with asthma, we do not recommend these as standard.

If someone’s asthma is bad enough to consider steroids it is essential they are assessed by a health care professional. Even at this busy time for the NHS, getting early support for any problems with your lungs is critical to keep you well and out of hospital.”

 

Along similar lines, please do not stockpile inhalers. If you haven’t needed one for many years don’t ask for one now. We are seeing increasing supply issues due to over-ordering. Please be patient with your community pharmacist, they are doing the best they can in difficult circumstances.

 

Health News from the BBC and the NHS

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NHS Choices Behind the Headlines
 
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